Chubby Chernobyl Fly

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Chubby Chernobyl Fly

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$1.99
Item#1465451-P
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If there’s one fly that has risen to the top of trout fishing “requirements” in recent years, it’s the Chubby Chernobyl. Despite its looks, this fly, like its predecessors, the Black Mamba and the Chernobyl Ant are deadly trout patterns.


The term in western Montana during the spring is often referred to as fishing a “chubby dropper” which is a Chubby Chernobyl on top and a Pat’s Rubber Legs below it which is like a “hopper dropper” set up.


It floats high, and it’s extremely easy to see. It is sold in a variety of colors and sizes. The foam helps it float and the synthetic wing makes it as easy to see as any strike indicator—meaning you can suspend heavier, bigger dropper patterns that will sink faster and get into the zone quicker.


So, instead of the simple Pat’s Rubber legs setup, you can experiment with double-beaded stone fly nymphs, balanced leeches, (maybe even a smaller Zirdle Bug?) and your Chubby pattern will stay on top.


The Chubby Chernobyl was created to resemble a stonefly pattern like a salmonfly, golden stone, or skwala but trout also commonly mistake this fly for a hopper or a cricket, and we have even got fish to eat these during a brown drake hatch.


This fly is so fishy, that sometimes we don’t understand why they eat it at all. Why do cutthroat trout eat the purple one so well? We don’t know, but they do, and this fly is essential if you are targeting trout in rivers.


  • Highly visible, highly floatable pattern
  • Foam body allows you to suspend a range of dropper patterns (even the heaviest ones)
  • One of the fishiest patterns you can buy, and a recommended one for first time fly fishers
  • An attractor pattern imitates a wide range of bugs that trout love